Programming Updates

So, here we are. Still in the midst of a global pandemic, but thankfully, in the Tubby Hook area of operation, one that has fallen to a manageable level. Let’s all hope that this only changes for the better, here and afar.

June was the first month that I began paddling personally, for fun, on anything like a regular basis, and in July I taught some classes at a local club, trying out some ways to accommodate concerns about COVID-19. I really enjoy teaching and guiding, and surprised myself with how much I enjoyed getting back to it.

Here are some steps, in addition to what’s been previously posted, that I’m taking for programs for the remainder of the year.

Unfortunately, with the changing state and local restrictions, I won’t be posting any courses ahead of time. If you would like to work on specific skills, or take part in a journey, please email jkm@tubbyhook.com

  1. For now, no programs run from Tubby Hook in Manhattan. The parking area has been closed off, and while some group activities are allowed, it’s better in my opinion to avoid.
  2. The ACA camp at Lake Sebago is open for member use, but not classes. This means no classes at the lake this year.
  3. On land, wear a mask. It should go in a drybag for taking it along on the water. No mask required on the water.
  4. I’m including hand sanitizer in my first aid kit, and asking that all clients bring their own. Think of it as another kind of sunscreen to have with you and apply regularly.
  5. Bring enough food and water for yourself. We will not be sharing food or water, except in emergency.
  6. Maintaining 6 feet distance as best as possible on the water.

Just to recap those previous steps:

  1. Courses may be cancelled on short notice, with a full refund.
  2. Coursework will minimize contact between participants.
  3. Cancellations by clients due to Covid or Covid-related reasons will be fully refunded.

Stay home if you’re sick, or have reason to expect you were exposed within the previous two weeks.

The CDC has some guidance specific to watersports, if not kayaking. There is no evidence of Coronavirus spreading through recreational waters.

Our main concern will be assisted rescues. When practicing, we’ll try to keep appropriate distance between rescuer and casualty, and try some other adaptations to be safe against Covid.

August and September are great times to be paddling in the Hudson River Valley. The water is as warm as it gets, and is refreshing in the summer heat. As Fall arrives, the foliage along the waterfront, especially the Palisades, can be quite beautiful.

Be safe, be well, be kind. I hope to hear from some of you, even if it’s just to keep in touch.

Cheers,

Julie McCoy

Statement on Coronavirus and COVID-19

March 14, 2020

For many Americans, the past week has featured a dramatic turn of events in the news about Coronavirus and COVID-19. The United States has declared a national emergency, and New York State, where Tubby Hook Paddle Company, has done the same.

The following resources from the CDC, NY State, and the City of New York, offer guidance and information about the virus and its associated disease.

The Paddlesports actvities organized by the Tubby Hook Paddle Company are generally very small in number, and with exceptions for rescues and rafting up, we’re inherently socially distant. Here are specific guidelines for upcoming courses:

  1. All courses are offered with the caveat that they may be cancelled on short notice with a full refund. Some courses rely on third-party facilities, and their actions may also affect course offerings.
  2. Coursework will be designed to minimize contact, especially participant-participant contact.
  3. Read the terms and conditions. In addition to these, any cancellations by clients due to Coronavirus or Covid-19 will be fully refunded. The page will be updated by the end of April but these additional terms are in effect immediately.

If you are sick, feeling sick, or have been near someone who gets sick, please stay home.

As many of you know, the Tubby Hook Paddle Company is primarily Julie McCoy. That is who is writing this. I care about each of my clients, many of whom are also friends. I want everyone to avoid what is statistically becoming unavoidable. Stay safe, be well, and if you have to be outdoors, considering sitting in a boat of your own, hundreds of yards from “civilization”.

Weekend Class in June

Learning at Lake Sebago.

I (Julie) was hoping to get some events together in April, but unfortunately a drysuit repair is going to take a few weeks, so no on-water activities until May.

That said, I’ve super-excited to say my fourth annual weekend-long kayak touring course at Lake Sebago is set for the weekend of June 22-23. You can register here.

In addition to the course, I’ve rented a cabin for participants to opt-in to stay at Friday and Saturday nights. There’s a refrigerator and stove for preparing meals, and the lake is a great getaway from urban life. I can also provide boats and a limited set of rental equipment.

The course is essentially the American Canoe Association’s “L2” skills curriculuum, covering strokes and rescues. The ACA’s sample syllabus lists the course as being do-able in about a day, leading to a common question I get, almost every year: why is this course a two-day course?

The main reason is that it’s a lot of material to cover, and cramming it all into a day is a bit of a smash-up. I’ve taught the course in a single day, in the past, and it becomes a long day. Students who I continued working with afterwards would remark that they didn’t feel everything stuck, and they spent more time in subsequent sessions honing in on the details.

So, that’s one approach. What I prefer is to dedicate the better part of a weekend, allowing more time for practice, for reflection, and for participants to let their synapses fire on their own. It takes more time and a bit of patience, but pays off in a stronger foundation for the long haul.