Statement on Coronavirus and COVID-19

March 14, 2020

For many Americans, the past week has featured a dramatic turn of events in the news about Coronavirus and COVID-19. The United States has declared a national emergency, and New York State, where Tubby Hook Paddle Company, has done the same.

The following resources from the CDC, NY State, and the City of New York, offer guidance and information about the virus and its associated disease.

The Paddlesports actvities organized by the Tubby Hook Paddle Company are generally very small in number, and with exceptions for rescues and rafting up, we’re inherently socially distant. Here are specific guidelines for upcoming courses:

  1. All courses are offered with the caveat that they may be cancelled on short notice with a full refund. Some courses rely on third-party facilities, and their actions may also affect course offerings.
  2. Coursework will be designed to minimize contact, especially participant-participant contact.
  3. Read the terms and conditions. In addition to these, any cancellations by clients due to Coronavirus or Covid-19 will be fully refunded. The page will be updated by the end of April but these additional terms are in effect immediately.

If you are sick, feeling sick, or have been near someone who gets sick, please stay home.

As many of you know, the Tubby Hook Paddle Company is primarily Julie McCoy. That is who is writing this. I care about each of my clients, many of whom are also friends. I want everyone to avoid what is statistically becoming unavoidable. Stay safe, be well, and if you have to be outdoors, considering sitting in a boat of your own, hundreds of yards from “civilization”.

Weekend Class in June

Learning at Lake Sebago.

I (Julie) was hoping to get some events together in April, but unfortunately a drysuit repair is going to take a few weeks, so no on-water activities until May.

That said, I’ve super-excited to say my fourth annual weekend-long kayak touring course at Lake Sebago is set for the weekend of June 22-23. You can register here.

In addition to the course, I’ve rented a cabin for participants to opt-in to stay at Friday and Saturday nights. There’s a refrigerator and stove for preparing meals, and the lake is a great getaway from urban life. I can also provide boats and a limited set of rental equipment.

The course is essentially the American Canoe Association’s “L2” skills curriculuum, covering strokes and rescues. The ACA’s sample syllabus lists the course as being do-able in about a day, leading to a common question I get, almost every year: why is this course a two-day course?

The main reason is that it’s a lot of material to cover, and cramming it all into a day is a bit of a smash-up. I’ve taught the course in a single day, in the past, and it becomes a long day. Students who I continued working with afterwards would remark that they didn’t feel everything stuck, and they spent more time in subsequent sessions honing in on the details.

So, that’s one approach. What I prefer is to dedicate the better part of a weekend, allowing more time for practice, for reflection, and for participants to let their synapses fire on their own. It takes more time and a bit of patience, but pays off in a stronger foundation for the long haul.